Man shares horrific video of sewage spill on Cornish beach with devastating effect on seaside town

A horrific video has been shared from a Cornish beach showing the devastating effects sewage spills are having on the sea.
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A horrific video has been shared from a Cornish beach showing the devastating effects sewage spills are having on the sea.

The huge discharge was caught on camera by a local surfer while down at Trevaunance Cove, St Agnes, Cornwall, on 30 October.

The footage of the sewage spill in Cornwall (Video: Jam Press)

A harrowing clip reveals a large section of the sea that has been turned brown following heavy rainfall.

The surfer starts the video by showing the sandy parts of the beach, before panning out and revealing an awful sight.

Video captured by local surfer (Video: Jam Press)

The dark brown water is taking over the bright, blue sea, reaching into the shore.

A huge line can also be seen showing the divide between the brown and the blue side of the ocean.

Recently, several sewage warnings have been issued on the north coast of Cornwall.

Environment charity Surfers Against Sewage (SAS) is warning against storm sewage at Trevaunance Cove but also at Mawgan Porth, Fistral North, Crantock, Trevaunance Cove, Godrevy Towans and Gwithian Beach.

The footage of the sewage spill in Cornwall (Video: Jam Press)

The warnings appear on the Safer Seas and Rivers Service, run by SAS, and are based on water firms’ data.

The pollution alerts read: “Storm sewage has been discharged from a sewer overflow in this location within the past 48 hours,” in which the places can be seen on the online map. Discharges are allowed for example after heavy rainfall, to stop the system being overwhelmed.

According to SAS, only 14% of UK rivers meet Good Ecological Status and Bathing Waters now languish at the bottom of the European Bathing Water table.

Jam Press reached out to Surfers Against Sewage for a comment, to which the chief executive, Hugo Tagholm said: “Since privatisation in 1989, the industry has ignored its mandate to invest in infrastructure upgrades, instead hosing their profits on dividends and bonuses.

The footage of the sewage spill in Cornwall (Video: Jam Press)

“Our beaches, rivers and lakes are some of our most precious natural resources but water companies are treating them as an open sewer, devastating wildlife and posing serious health risks to all those who attempt to enjoy them.

“It’s time for change – the water industry and regulatory bodies must stop cutting financial corners in favour of greedy shareholders and make protecting our wild waters their top priority.”

According to SAS, in 2020 alone, sewage was pumped into rivers and seas nationwide over 400,000 times, totalling over 3.1 million hours of sewage polluting our waterways.